Welcome to SuperDARN!
SuperDARN stands for Super Dual Auroral Radar Network. The network consists of over 30 low-power HF radars that look into Earth's upper atmosphere beginning at mid-latitudes and extending into the polar regions. The radars operate continuously and observe the motion of charged particles (plasma) in the ionosphere and other effects that provide scientists with information on Earth's space environment. The knowledge gained from this work provides insight into space weather hazards including radiation exposure for high-altitude travelers and disruptions to communication networks, navigation systems (GPS), and electrical power grids.

The SuperDARN Research Group at Virginia Tech (VT) collaborates with an international community of scientists and engineers to operate radars and share data. The VT Group operates five radars. For a summary of the radars and their affiliations, visit the Radar Maps/Tables/Links web page.

SuperDARN - An NSF Geospace Facility
The U.S. component of SuperDARN is funded by the National Science Foundation under the Geospace Facilities (GF) program as a collaboration between Virginia Tech (lead institution) and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). The primary SuperDARN web site is hosted by JHU/APL. Supporting web sites are hosted by MSI/SuperDARN partners at Dartmouth College and University of Alaska Fairbanks. Click logos for access.



VT SuperDARN student Muhammad Rafiq passes PhD Qualifying Exam

By: miker  on: Mon., Nov. 17, 2014 05:45 PM EST  (33 Reads)
Muhammad successfully sat his PhD Qualifying Exam on Monday, November 17 before a committee consisting of three professors. He is advised by Virginia Tech SuperDARN professors Jo Baker and Mike Ruohoniemi. Muhammad began his graduate work in the Antennas area but transferred to the Electromagnetics area and the SuperDARN project this past summer.

Congratulations, Muhammad!

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First Light at the Hokkaido West SuperDARN radar!

By: miker  on: Fri., Aug. 22, 2014 10:22 AM EDT  (422 Reads)
PI Nozomu Nishitani of the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STELab) in Nagoya is pleased to announce that the Hokkaido West radar started operation on October 24, 2014. The first echoes were received after extensive testing by the Japanese licensing authority.

Nishitani-san would like to thank all the people who contributed to the completion of the new radar, in particular, Mick Parsons from Leicester University, who travelled all the way to Japan to make final installation of the radar, and Pasha Ponomarenko and Alexey Oinats, who happened to be staying at Nagoya University during this period and helped with setting up and calibration.

Congratulations to Nishitani-san, and to the Hokkaido West radar team!

Photo: Main array of 16 transmit / receive antennas in foreground and interferometer array of 4 receive-only antennas in background.

Stokkseyri radar transferred to new SuperDARN PI Jim Wild

By: miker  on: Mon., June 23, 2014 01:26 PM EDT  (541 Reads)
As announced at the 2014 SuperDARN Workshop held in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, the ownership of the Stokkseyri SuperDARN radar has been transferred from CNRS/LPCE (France) and PI Dr. Aurelie Marchaudon to Lancaster University (UK) and new SuperDARN PI Prof. James Wild. The Stokkseyri radar was constructed in 1994 as part of the first wave of radar construction under the newly-founded SuperDARN collaboration and its first PI was Dr. Jean-Paul Villain. It forms a common-volume pair with the Goose Bay SuperDARN radar.

Jim studied for a degree in Physics with Space Science and Technology before completing a doctorate in solar-terrestrial physics at the University of Leicester. He is the Professor of Space Physics at Lancaster University’s Department of Physics. He was elected to membership in the SuperDARN PI committee at the Svalbard Workshop.

Congratulations, Jim!
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2014 SuperDARN Workshop on Svalbard (Norway), May 25-30, 2014

By: Nathaniel Frissell  on: Sun., Dec. 08, 2013 02:42 PM EST  (2436 Reads)
Registration Website: http://www.unis.no/superdarn2014/(external link)
Meeting Dates: May 25-30, 2014
Deadlines for Registration & Accommodation: 23rd February 2014
Deadline for Abstracts: 25th April 2014
Deadline for Requesting Eduroam account: 15th May 2014 - Click 'Read More' for details
The 2014 SuperDARN meeting is going to be held in Longyearbyen, Svalbard (Norway). Longyearbyen is located on an archipelago at 78˚ North Latitude, making it one of the northernmost towns in the world. Longyearbyen has a long history of auroral and ionospheric research and is home to EISCAT Svalbard Incoherent Scatter Radar, the Kjell Henriksen Auroral Observatory, and the University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS). Longyearbyen is slated to be a future site of a SuperDARN radar.

Pictured: The 32 m dish of the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR). This radar operates in the 500 MHz band with a peak transmitter power of 1.0 MW. Foreground: Students from UNIS, the world's northernmost institution for higher education and research.

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VT Crew makes repairs to the Kapuskasing Radar

By: miker  on: Thu., Oct. 16, 2014 10:40 PM EDT  (145 Reads)
Kevin and Mike from Virginia Tech traveled to northern Ontario October 2 - 8 to visit the site of the Kapuskasing SuperDARN radar and make repairs. A number of technical issues were addressed including the performance of the interferometer array. By the conclusion of the trip all 15 available transmitters were functioning although a couple were out on receive owing to a lack of a needed spare part. The sensitivity of the radar has been significantly improved, in time for the first dark moon campaign period at the end of October. A slow internet connection continues to be worked on. This was the first meeting of the VT crew with the new site operator, Mr. Ghislain LeBouef. Ghislain participated in the repairs and arranged discussions with local vendors.

Photo: Kevin makes connections to the low-power T/R switch in a transmitter.
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Fort Hays Trip, May 2014

By: ksterne  on: Thu., July 03, 2014 10:33 AM EDT  (653 Reads)
In early April, the returns from the Fort Hays radars changed drastically. The problem began on April 4th with very noise signals being recorded on both radars. The original problem seemed to begin with a blown fuse in the PTS160 synthesizer. However, in the process of replacing the fuse, some of the connections on the back of the QNX6 computer must have come loose. In phone and e-mail conversations with Ryan White, FHSU SuperDARN intern, it seemed as though something was wrong with the RXFE or the way the RXFE was being controlled. In the end, it seemed as though a touchy connection between one of the outputs of the QNX6 computer and the control cable was causing the RXFE to not keep the correct settings. A replacement for this connection was put together and a trip was made to the site to repair this connection as well as do an assessment of the site.

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